Inspiration & storytelling

Hereunder you will find more information about some amazing flowers. Please contact us is you have any further questions or need assistance.

Winter 2018/2019

Besides being a beautiful period, winter is also a difficult time for the florist. Before Christmas, it is unbelievably busy with preparations for the holidays. Numerous Christmas centrepieces are sold and an increasing number of them include flowers. In addition to pretty greenery and foliage and Christmas baubles, why not decorate them with flowers like…

Read More

Autumn 2018

You could say autumn is the most exciting time of the year for the florist. In addition to the many flowering crops still available, there is a range of berry products that give the shop a unique atmosphere. Of course, at this time of the year, Autumn Break and Halloween are important for setting the…

Read More
Achillea

Achillea is quite a large genus from the composites of the Aster family. Achillea owes its name to the Greek hero Achilles who is said to have healed a wound with this herb during the Trojan war. Achillea has many types, some of which are well-established in floriculture. The most important of these are the filipendulina, the so-called yellow yarrow. These are the large, hard yellow flower heads which are sometimes also used in combination with Eryngium gigantheum. Another form is the clypeolata, to which the soft yellow Achillea Moonshine once belonged. The name Achillea millefolium literally means thousand leaf (mille is thousand and folie is leaf). This species in particular, comes in many colours from soft pink to deep red. A little less familiar, but still an important group for the summer flowers is the Achillea ptarmica, commonly known as Wild Bertram. Cultivated species from this plant are usually white and have the unique property of being good to use as dried flower. There are also Cultivars of this species that, as cut flowers, have Daisy-like appearance. Achillea originated in Europe and the temperate regions of Asia, and formerly appreciated for their aromatic fragrance and medicinal properties as a stimulant and tonic. Achillea was also used as an anti-inflammatory.

Agapanthus

The Agapanthus is also known as the African lily. Currently, it officially belongs to the Alliaceae family. That there is still doubt as to where it really belongs, is illustrated by the fact that up to 2003, the plant was included in the Lilaceae (Lily-like) and that now Agapanthaceae is also mentioned. In yet another system, the Agapanthus is classified as a sub-species of the Amarillidaceae (Amarillis family), to which the Nerine and the Narcissus also belong. It is almost certain that the Agapanthus is a distant relative of the Aspergus family. A long story for the enthusiast who can conclude from this that things are not as cut and dried as you might think. Nice for the experts to get a good discussion going.
Although the Agapanthus is often referred to as a bulb, it is in fact a perennial. In the Netherlands, the Agapanthus is cultivated as such. Because the Agapanthus is in fact an evergreen plant, it does give problems with frost in severe winters. On an island like Madeira the plant stays green all year round on the side of the road and turns the roadsides into a flower paradise in spring. At Dutch growers, the leaf dies off in late autumn and the plants are decked with straw to protect them from frost. So, it is a perennial, but not a hardy perennial. The colours of the Agapanthus vary from pure white to dark blue and everything in between. Breeding focuses partly on the garden market and therefore on reducing sensitivity to frost. For cut flowers, in addition to health, focus is on flowering period, colour and the quality of the flower stem. As with most breeding, the health of the plant plays also a major role with the Agapanthus.

Alchemilla

The Alchemilla is also known as Lady’s Mantle. The plant belongs to the Rose family (Rosaceae). The plant’s full name is actually Alchemilla mollis. Mollis stands for soft in Latin. The Alchemilla is a perennial that can be found in many parts of the world. The plant comes mainly from Europe and Asia and in some mountainous regions in Africa and North and South America. The name Lady’s Mantle lies not only in the word mollis (soft), the name probably also comes from the old medicinal purpose of alleviating menstrual pain. The Alchemilla is a fairly well-known garden plant. Dwarf varieties are also bred for this purpose. For floriculture the collection is limited to two varieties, namely the Alchemilla mollis and the Alchemilla mollis robustica. The latter makes up about 95% of the market. Alchemilla is mainly used for decoration and to complement other flowers. Due to the neutral colour, open structure and easy availability, these flowers an actually be included anywhere. So the Alchemilla actually forms the basis to a seasonal flower bouquet.

Allium

The Allium belongs to the garlic family (Alliaceae). The genus Allium consists of 700 species worldwide of which very many are suitable for human consumption. Of course the most important is the regular onion, but also the fragrant crops such as Garlic, Chives, Welsh Onion and Scallion belong to the same genus. What is less known is that a large number of Allium is bred as ornamental plant and even as cut flower. As a cut flower, it’s not only about the colour of the Allium but also its shape. There are species that grow up to 1.5 metres tall and species that grow no longer than 30 centimetres, and bloom yellow. In addition, there are species that have an inflorescence with diameter of 30 centimetres. The ornamental onion is actually a flower bulb. The bulbs grow in spring and produce a flower at the end of the growth. After flowering, the plant above ground dies and the bulb is dug up, stored and treated so that it can flower again the following year.

From the grower:
The Allium range is enormous. The search for wild species has resulted in a large variety of shapes. The breeders have exploited the extremely beautiful species even more by specifically cross-breeding these deviant shapes, so that for some types, it’s as if the bulb has exploded and a galaxy of flowers has burst out (Allium schubertii). So in addition to the bulb shape, which predominates in any bouquet, for flower lovers the bouquet can be developed into a real work of art. Here, the grower is so proud of his creation that he called the flower after his daughter (Purple Caila). This sturdy variety distinguishes itself by its larger flowers and set colour. To top it all, there are also types of Allium whose elegance is due to their completely curled stem. Anyone who wants to create a flower arrangement certainly should not overlook the Allium.

Amaranthus

The Amaranthus is part of the Amarantian family (Amaranthaceae). The official Dutch name means Parrot Herb. The Amaranthus genus, consisting of about 60 different species, originated in temperate and tropical regions. In many parts of the world, this plant is grown as a vegetable. It is on the menu in some restaurants as Chinese spinach. The vegetable is used in Europe to replace grain in a gluten-free diet. The seeds were an important source of food to ancient Indian tribes like the Inca and Aztec and were also used to prepare ritual drinks and food.
Many more edible crops such as the Swiss chard belong to this family. Quinoa is also a typical family member. This crop is grown as a cut flower, but is also an extremely popular super food. The Celosia cut flower also belongs to this family. A range of Amaranthus is used as cut flowers. The most well-known is the Amaranthus caudatus, also known as Cat’s Tail Amaranth. These red and green hanging Arens are a gem that almost every florist can use to complete a flower arrangement. Less impressive but very usable in a bouquet is the Amaranthus paniculata. This upright form also comes in deep red and green and gives a flower arrangement a very natural look.

From the grower: Since the hanging Amaranthus is also grown in the greenhouse in the Netherlands, this flower is available from the Netherlands from mid-May till the end of October. There are parties that offer more that are grown outdoors in the second half of the summer. The upright variant is a real late-summer product and is available from mid-August. Because the grower of hanging Amaranthus can plant on the plantlets all year round, the florist can rely on having these wonderful beauties almost all year.
Although the leaf is sometimes fragile, the flower has an excellent shelf-life. Experience has shown that most florists remove the leaves and only use the flower. Remarkably, the flowers keep their beauty and colour even in dry conditions. Something the creative florist and consumer can certainly benefit from.

Amarine

The Amarine, like the Nerine, belongs to the Amaryllis family (Amarylliaceae). The Amaryllis, Narcissus and Snowdrop also belong to this family. The common feature of this family is the ovary is not in the flower, but underneath in a so-called inferior ovary. This is also true for the Amarine. Amarine is a cross between the Amaryllis and Nerine genera. The Amarine predominantly displays the characteristics of the Nerine, so the Amerine looks mainly like a very big, sturdy Nerine. Amarine is distinguished by its opulent, full bloom with large flowers. Both in the garden and in the vase, this flower has a very good shelf-life. Amarine is available in the colours white, pink, deep pink and soft pink.

From the grower:
The Amarine is a fairly new product that is already available for most of the year. The production period is roughly from August up to and including March. Because of the larger, firmer flowers, this flower is able to serve as the main flower in a bouquet.

Artemisia

In the world of cooking, Artemisia is certainly just as well-known as the cut flower variety. Lemon balm, Absinthe, Tarragon and Wormwood are used in almost every kitchen. All these herbs are types of Artemisia. In floriculture, Artemisia is used partly because of its clear herbal fragrance, but for part of the range it is its visible feature that makes the plant so popular. Some species look like they are silver. Because the colour of the leaf and not the flowers is important here, the Artemisia is a consistent element in any bouquet in which this silver colour is used. If the customer is also surprised by the herbal fragrance of the bouquet the sale will be closed quickly.

Asclepias

The Asclepias is commonly known as milkweed. The Dutch call it the silk plant, because of the silk found on the seeds. When the seed box opens, the silk can be seen. All Asclepias have this feature. Asclepias Beatrix is no exception. Asclepias Beatrix is the Queen of the Asclepias. When you look at the flower of this beauty, it takes very little imagination to see a real crown. It’s really special if the crown is orange.

Astilbe

The name Astilbe is regularly confused with Spirea. This is probably because in Germany the Astilbe is often referred to as false (not true) Spirea. Spirea is in fact a woody shrub that hardly has anything to do with Astilbe. Astilbe is also sometimes called goat’s beard. To add to the confusion, there is also the false goat’s beard, namely the Aruncus silvertris. This plant strongly resembles a large, white Astilbe, but flowers a couple of weeks earlier and is even a member of a completely different family. In addition, there is also the marsh Spirea (filipendula). These plants, also cut as flowers, are similar to the Astilbe but do not have a plume and belong to the same family as the Aruncus. So, the name Spirea is not the correct name for Astilbe, but this confusion is not of much significance, as long as you don’t think it is the same product.

Astrantia

In the Netherlands, Astrantia is also called “Zeeland’s button”. This has nothing to do with the origin of the plant, but with its appearance. The little flower looks a lot like the buttons on the original traditional clothing of Zeeland. (see photo right). The plant belongs to the umbelliforous plants (Apiaceae). The plant originated in Eastern Europe and Asia. In the wild, it spreads in Europe from Poland, southern Germany and southern France to the Mediterranean region. In the Netherlands, Astrantia is mainly a cut flower. By continuous cultivation, there are currently various colours of this flower on the market. What is remarkable is the beautiful, large white Astrantia “Shaggy”. Really beautiful and currently very topical is the old pink variety, Maxima. This Maxima is quite difficult to grow, but Summerflowers grower Meer en Drecht has supplied it in top quality for years. Next to Asclepias Beatrix, this is one of the Royal flowers from our growers. Astrantia is also used medicinally. Traditionally, the herb is used as a stomach tonic. Of course this is only possible after processing; it is not a good idea to just eat an Astrantia. The extensive availability and excellent vase-life ensure that Astrantia will soon be found in every florist.

Brassica

Brassica or ornamental cabbage is actually no different from the edible cabbage except it is at a much younger stage and of course from another range. Actually, the ornamental cabbage is just as much a cabbage as the violier. The violier is also a type of cabbage with very pretty flowers. It is important to know that the old belief that cabbage stinks, no longer applies. By means of an improved breeding method and better understanding of treatment after harvesting, an ornamental cabbage that is not kept for too long will not start to stink in the vase. This is an important story that needs to be told for the sale of ornamental cabbage. Although the collection of ornamental cabbage is quite small right now, the possibility of painting the product facilitates a wide range of uses.

Callistephs

Callistephus is often called the summer Aster. Although it is part of the Aster family, it is another genus. Most of the Asters we know are perennials and often called autumn Asters. The Callistephus however, is grown as an annual from seed. The breeders cultivate prettier and more reliable seeds from the often already consistent seeds. The full name of this flower Callistephus Chinensis. The first part of the name means annual Aster and indicates the difference from the autumn Aster, which is a perennial. The second part of the name means the plant comes from China. At the moment, this flower is grown almost globally. In Europe we call this, naturalized. The flowers have been grown here for so long that they have adapted to the climate where they are grown. Cultivation of this flower is quite difficult because the plant can only be grown on soil with a consistent composition and extremely good structure. It is also important that the flower is grown on fresh soil. That the flower has fully assimilated can be seen on the two old pictures. In the former USSR it even appeared on a postage stamp. The other old picture is from 1833. Now, no proper summer flower bouquet would be complete without the summer Aster. It is also available in countless forms. In short, an immensely important product for the summer flowers.

Callistephus

Callistephus is often called the summer Aster. Although it is part of the Aster family, it is another genus. Most of the Asters we know are perennials and often called autumn Asters. The Callistephus however, is grown as an annual from seed. The breeders cultivate prettier and more reliable seeds from the often already consistent seeds. The full name of this flower Callistephus Chinensis. The first part of the name means annual Aster and indicates the difference from the autumn Aster, which is a perennial. The second part of the name means the plant comes from China. At the moment, this flower is grown almost globally. In Europe we call this, naturalized. The flowers have been grown here for so long that they have adapted to the climate where they are grown. Cultivation of this flower is quite difficult because the plant can only be grown on soil with a consistent composition and extremely good structure. It is also important that the flower is grown on fresh soil. That the flower has fully assimilated can be seen on the two old pictures. In the former USSR it even appeared on a postage stamp. The other old picture is from 1833. Now, no proper summer flower bouquet would be complete without the summer Aster. It is also available in countless forms. In short, an immensely important product for the summer flowers.

Campanula

The Campanula is also known as the Bluebell. The botanical name Campanula is the Latin word for “bell”. The plant belongs to the bell family (Campanulaceae). Plants that also belong to the Campanulaceae include Trachelium, Platicodon en Lobelia. There are over 300 known species of Campanula that originally grew in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, with the most significant appearance in the Mediterranean region east of the Caucasians. There are Campanulas of just a couple of centimetres to tall species that can reach up to two metres. Certainly something to suit everyone’s taste for the garden. The commonest colour of the Campanula is blue but there are also purple, pink and white varieties. There are annual and biennial Campanulas and also perennial varieties. Mainly the biennial and the perennial are used for cutting. An important perennial for cutting is the Cup Campanula, Campanula glomerata. In Latin, glomerata means tangled shape. The Dutch name for this Campanula means “tangled bell”. This variety has a whole tangle of little flowers in its cup.

From the grower:

The Campanula glomerata is also known as the Cup Campanula because this variety has most of its flowers in the cup. This Campanula is a perennial that first has to grow for a season before flowering in the early summer. If the plantlet is planted in spring, the plant will only develop green leaves. Only after the plant has had enough cold in the winter, will the flower stems, developed the previous year, emerge. To bring flowering forward, after it has had sufficient cold, this Campanula will be put into the greenhouse. In many cases that is done with a so-called rolling greenhouse. A rolling greenhouse is a large greenhouse on wheels. After the winter, when the Campanula has had enough cold, the whole greenhouse is rolled over the plot. The rolling greenhouse is a familiar, but slowly disappearing phenomenon of the Bulb region. In the past, these greenhouses were mainly used to speed up flowering bulbs like the Narcissus and Tulip. It is actually quite something to experience the rolling out of a rolling greenhouse. It is quite impressive to stand in a construction of more than 600 square metres that can just shift to another place.
Colours and shapes. There is also a continuous search to improve the Campanula glomerata, resulting in new colours. The breeders are now working on a Cup Campanula that produces bubbles instead of bells. For the Campanula, health is also an important breeding criterion. No matter how beautiful the plant, if it is not healthy it will not be bred.

Celosia

The Celosia is an indigenous plant to India and China and belongs to the Amaranthus family (Amaranthaceae). As a result of the extensive collecting done by our predecessors, these are now grown in many parts of the world as ornamental plants. It is a beloved ornamental plant, particularly in the USA. In India, West-Africa and South America, the Celosia is grown mainly as a vegetable. The original Celosia stood out mainly because of the bright colours. In warm parts of China, the plum variety grows so fast it is classified as a weed. In China, the comb Celosia is called cockscomb (Chi Kuan). In the Netherlands the Celosia is bred as a border plant and cut flower. The Comb Celosia is the most striking due to its broad inflorescence, which is sometimes compared to a brain.

From the grower:
The Celosia is especially loved for the combination of extremely bright colours, combined with a striking flower shape. The comb in particular, is a real eye catcher. The flower can be combined with every other flower, while remaining striking. The comb Celosia is bred in Dutch greenhouses between April and November. In the summer, there are even Giant Celosias on sale, the so-called Turbo series. These combs can grow up to 25 centimetres in diameter, and are a flower arrangement themselves. The Celosia used now is handier and can in fact be used in every bouquet or arrangement. Sometimes the combs are so thick that they almost form mini bulbs. Part of this treatment is certainly the use of a really clean vase. Cloudy water caused by a dirty vase is in fact the only threat to the durability of the Celosia.

Delphinium

Delphinium is the Latin name for the summer flower Larkspur. It owes its name to the track found behind each individual flower. Nice to point out, if you want to bring attention to the flower, or as a good opening line if the flower is standing on a small table. Perhaps it is an appropriate Father’s Day gift for all the fathers who have earned their stripes. Did you know that the seed Larkspur is actually a different genus, namely Consolida? Its correct name is Consolida ajasis. This Larkspur also has that familiar track behind every flower. The photo is of the Delphinium ‘Volkerfrieden’.

Dianthus

The botanical name for Carnation is Dianthus and belongs Carnation sorts (Caryophyllaceae). The name is derived from Dios, god and Anthos, meaning flower. A divine flower. Baby’s Breath, Lychnis (burning love) and Saponaria (soapwort) also belong to this family. The name Dianthus has probably been around since 300 years BC. The Carnation is indigenous to Europe and Asia. Some species are indigenous to Southern Africa. In 15th century Provence, whole hills were planted with Carnations. The scent of the Carnation has been used in perfumery for a long time. Who isn´t familiar with fragrant potpourris in which the Carnation is widely used? Although there are many types of Carnation on the market, the large-flowered, double Carnation, the so-called standard Carnation, remains the gem of the collection.

From the grower
The large-flowered Carnation experienced enormous popularity in the past. Next to the Rose, this Carnation was one of the top typically Dutch products. Modern times and the arrival of many other flowers, as well as the introduction of the spray Carnation, pushed this beautiful flower somewhat to the background. A few years ago, growers re-discovered this flower, and the results speak for themselves. Through renewed breeding, this Carnation can be bred healthily again and the market has also changed. Many successful models from the past are returning in current trends. Just like the New Beetle, the New Fiat 500 and the New Mini, this Carnation has also been fully adapted to the demands of modern times and now suits the trend-sensitive consumer exactly. The fact that the Dutch prince, Bernard always had a (white) Carnation in his buttonhole just goes to show that this flower always had a bit of grandeur. The many new colours and excellent vase-quality herald a new successful period for the new standard Carnation.

From the grower: The Dianthus solomio is a variety of the familiar spray Carnation. Through breeding, the shape of the flower of this spray Carnation has changed. The flowers bloom high on the branch and the petals arrange themselves almost horizontally flat, creating a surprisingly beautiful effect. The solomio petals are clearly larger than those of the normal spray Carnation. This, along with the horizontal position, results in a beautiful whole. Almost more surprising is that the solomio excels in colour. Almost every colour of this series is so vibrant that they stand out in any bouquet. Almost as a counterpart to this colourful delight, there is a practically black variety, called Black Jack. A feature of the solomio is its excellent shelf-life; it maintains its clear colour in the vase from beginning to.

Dianthus_tros

The botanical name for Carnation is Dianthus and belongs Carnation sorts (Caryophyllaceae). The name is derived from Dios, god and Anthos, meaning flower. A divine flower. Baby’s Breath, Lychnis (burning love) and Saponaria (soapwort) also belong to this family. The name Dianthus has probably been around since 300 years BC. The Carnation is indigenous to Europe and Asia. Some species are indigenous to Southern Africa. In 15th century Provence, whole hills were planted with Carnations. The scent of the Carnation has been used in perfumery for a long time. Who isn´t familiar with fragrant potpourris in which the Carnation is widely used? Although there are many types of Carnation on the market, the large-flowered, double Carnation, the so-called standard Carnation, remains the gem of the collection.

From the grower
The large-flowered Carnation experienced enormous popularity in the past. Next to the Rose, this Carnation was one of the top typically Dutch products. Modern times and the arrival of many other flowers, as well as the introduction of the spray Carnation, pushed this beautiful flower somewhat to the background. A few years ago, growers re-discovered this flower, and the results speak for themselves. Through renewed breeding, this Carnation can be bred healthily again and the market has also changed. Many successful models from the past are returning in current trends. Just like the New Beetle, the New Fiat 500 and the New Mini, this Carnation has also been fully adapted to the demands of modern times and now suits the trend-sensitive consumer exactly. The fact that the Dutch prince, Bernard always had a (white) Carnation in his buttonhole just goes to show that this flower always had a bit of grandeur. The many new colours and excellent vase-quality herald a new successful period for the new standard Carnation.

From the grower: The Dianthus solomio is a variety of the familiar spray Carnation. Through breeding, the shape of the flower of this spray Carnation has changed. The flowers bloom high on the branch and the petals arrange themselves almost horizontally flat, creating a surprisingly beautiful effect. The solomio petals are clearly larger than those of the normal spray Carnation. This, along with the horizontal position, results in a beautiful whole. Almost more surprising is that the solomio excels in colour. Almost every colour of this series is so vibrant that they stand out in any bouquet. Almost as a counterpart to this colourful delight, there is a practically black variety, called Black Jack. A feature of the solomio is its excellent shelf-life; it maintains its clear colour in the vase from beginning to.

Dicentra

Dicentra is an extraordinarily beautiful flowering decorative plant of the Poppy family (Papaveraceae). The name is derived from the special shape of the flower and in Greek means “two tracks”. The Dicentra is indigenous to East Asia and North America. There are approximately 8 main types, but only the Spectabilis is used for floriculture. This species comes in pink and white. The pink variety is actually two-tone, because the tear that comes out of the pink heart is almost white. The Dicentra has many local names. The most common are: Crying Heart, Maria’s Tears and Broken Heart. The last is actually the most typical. When the flower is in bud, it looks exactly like a heart. If the flower is in full bloom, the heart breaks open from underneath and a tear escapes. This tear in turn leads to the other names such as Crying Heart and Maria’s Tears. In addition to its use as a cut flower, there are many species that belong to the earliest bloomers in the flower garden.

From the grower:

The Dicentra is a perennial plant and is propagated by cuttings. These cuttings first have to grow for a year without flowers being cut from them. In the second year they produce flowers that can be cut. Then the stems shoot out of the ground and after three weeks the flower is ripe for cutting. To obtain a dispersion of flowers, the grower puts plastic tunnels over the plants so that flowering can be brought forward. By putting the tunnels on at different times, Dicentra can be harvested for a longer period. The Dicentra flower is so obviously heart-shaped, that the connection with love is taken for granted. This beautiful flower is also available in white, so its use in a bridal bouquet can only mean beauty and love. With a Dicentra, Cupid always hits the mark.

Eryngium

In English the Cross Thistle belongs to the Umbelliferae family (Apiaceae). The Eryngium does not belong to the Echinops, which is also known as the globe thistle and belongs to the Aster family. Flowers such as Astrantia, Bupleurum, Anethum (dill) and Angelica belong to the same family. There are no less than 230 types of Eryngium, but the most important types for floriculture are alpinum and planum. The Eryngium alpinum is known as the Alpine Thistle and the Eryngium planum the Raspberry Thistle. The flowers of the Eryngium are attractive both for their shape and their colour. Some wild species, like the Sea Thistle, are very prickly. Its common name, Sea Holly (referring to the Holly bush), reflects this. Also the Eryngium giganteum is very prickly and is used together with Achillea filipendulina to make a traditional bouquet. The Eryngium alpinum triggers the imagination of florists most. The intense blue to purple colour, in addition to the outspoken form, does very well in the summer bouquet. The Eryngium is extremely attractive to bees, which shows it really is a family member of the Angelica, which is sometimes literally swarmed by bees.

Euphorbia

Euphorbia is a very large plant genus with about 2300 species. Although most of the species do not resemble each other at all, they still have a common property, namely the milky sap if they are damaged. This is why the Dutch name means Wolf’s Milk. The species are so diverse that it’s hard to believe that the soft branches of the Euphorbia palustris and the extremely hard Euphorbia milii are from the same plant genus. What many people do not know is that the Christmas Star (Euphorbia pulcherrima) is a real Euphorbia, just like the Euphorbia virosa that actually looks more like a cactus. Besides being an ornamental plant, the Euphorbia is also used in medicine. The name Euphorbia is derived from Euphorbos. Euphorbos was physician to King Juba II of Mauritania. Within Summerflowers we handle two totally different Euphorbias, namely the Euphorbia fulgens, those beautiful coloured feathers, and Euphorbia amygdaloides that is currently being harvested outdoors. This yellow-green flower branch grows at the end of winter on the surviving parts of the previous year. All the photos below and next to this item are of Euphorbias.

Gentiana

Gentian is a genus of the Gentian Family (Gentianaceae). In Europe there are 35 species of Gentian, found mainly in the Alps. The Gentian species used as cut flowers originate in the mountains of Eastern Asia, Japan in particular. The name Gentian comes from Gentius. He was the king of Illyria (Slovenia). He was said to have discovered the medicinal properties of the Gentian. The healing power of the Gentian is in the roots of this plant. A liqueur even is extracted from the roots of some species. The Gentian is also used in medicines, bittering agent and appetite stimulant. The large yellow species are mainly used to produce Schnapps. The Chinese character for Gentian means “dragon flower”. The Gentian is also one of the flowers that actually has its own colour, namely Gentian Blue.
The Gentian is vital as a cut flower in the collection of seasonal flowers. The colour is striking and it has a good shelf-life. If cut flower plant food is used, even the still developing flowers keep their colour well in the vase. Not only is cut flower plant food good for extending the vase-life of the Gentian, it also enhances colour retention. To bring out the colour of the flower even better, the leaves found between the flowers can be shortened. This also has a positive effect on the shelf-life. In addition to the colour Gentian Blue, the cut flower is also on the market in other colours, for example, pink, purple, white and even two-tone varieties. The Gentian is available from mid-April to mid-November (with peak production between July and September) and can easily be used as a standard in a bouquet or flower arrangement. The somewhat stolen term “Gentian Blue, suits you” fits in with the aim of letting more people enjoy everything the Gentian as cut flower has to offer.

Helianthus

The Helianthus or Sunflower belongs to the collective family of floral crops (Asteraceae). A large number of plants belong to this family, for example, the Aster, but also the bullet thistle (Echinops) and the Echinacea (Cornflower). The Sunflower we breed as a cut flower is the Helianthus annuus, or single year. The Helianthus tuberosus is a perennial plant, also known as the Jerusalem Artichoke. The name Sunflower is a very literal translation from the Greek. Helios is in fact SUN and Anthos means FLOWER. Although all over the world the Sunflower is bred mainly for use in sunflower oil, breeding in the Netherlands focuses on the Sunflower as cut flower. The Sunflower as we know it largely has Vincent van Gogh to thank for its fame. The painting of the sunflowers is one of his most famous works. It is not entirely coincidental that the major breakthrough of the Sunflower coincided with the Van Gogh year, almost 20 years ago. One wonderful story is that the rosette of the Sunflower turns to follow the sun, so that it in the evenings, it always faces the same direction. This stops once the Sunflower is fully ripened. This is why a field of Sunflowers in full flower all look the same way. A wonderful sight if you drive through the Sunflower fields above Paris.

From the grower:

The sunflowers bred for their flowers are from different varieties than those grown for their oil. A number of growers have put a lot of effort into Sunflowers with the correct stem-length and shape to be used as cut flowers. In addition, when breeding these varieties, it takes a lot of attention to keep them disease resistant. In order to supply Sunflowers for a longer period, different varieties that flower consecutively are used. Although there are virtually no differences their appearance, this is extremely important for the grower. In addition to breeding-technical properties there are now also several different colour tones on the market. The most important are the lighter, lemon-yellow and the filled Sunflower. Even brown varieties are also grown to a very limited degree. There is an important distinction with the small flowering species, one of which is the Sonja. This sunflower is topped so that multiple smaller flowers, which can be harvested separately, grow on one cultivar. Because of this Sunflower, there is also a place for the Sunflower in smaller bouquets. The colour of the Sonja is slightly darker than that of the Sunrich Orange, the undisputed market leader.

Helleborus

The Dutch name for the perennial, Helleborus, actually means ‘sneeze herb’. This is because the plant was formerly used to make sneezing powder. Many Dutch (local) plant names come from the medicinal uses of the past. Before people recognised their decorative value, many perennials were used in medicine. Probably the most well-known Helleborus is the Christmas rose (Helleborus niger). Although the flower does not belong to the rose family at all, that is what it is called. The Helleborus belongs to the Ranunculaceae or Ranunculus family. By origin, the Peony rose (not a rose either) and of course the Ranunculus belong to the same family. The real Christmas rose or Helleborus niger is only used as a cut flower in the middle of winter at Christmas time. Christmas simply wouldn’t be the same without these completely white flowers. Later, in spring, the Helleborus orientalis, or Spring Rose, is used. This variety has a longer stem and is available in a lot more colours.

From the grower:
The length of the stem of the Helleborus orientalis has become much longer through breeding, so it is now possible to use it as a cut flower. In addition to breeding for stem length, it is now bred for colour and shape of flower. There are currently a multitude of shapes and colours on the market that, due to the ambitions of the growers, continue to increase. In the Netherlands, and more so in Belgium, Helleborus days are organized to show off all their beauty. With the Helleborus orientalis, it is important that the flowers are ripe enough to be cut, so that the flower stem remains hard. This has improved a lot in recent years through breeding. A wonderful addition to the collection is the Helleborus hybrid Magnificent Bells ® that has a vase-life of several weeks if cut at an early stage. A really nice way to use the Helleborus orientalis is in water bowls. If you take the flowers off the stem and put them in a shallow dish, you create a work of art, definitely an eye-catcher for any festive occasion.

Hyacint-snij

Like the Hosta and Grape Hyacinth, the Hyacinth belongs to the Asparagus family (Asparagaceae). The Hyacinth has its origins in the eastern Mediterranean region, somewhere between Lebanon and central Turkey. Initially, Hyacinths were also cultivated in this area; later cultivation came, by way of France, to the Bulb region of Holland. The sandy soils of the Bulb region turned out to be ideally suited to growing this extraordinary flower. That is why cultivation of a really large crop only developed here. Propagation has yielded over 2000 cultivars from the first Hyacinths. Initially, when propagating, the colour of the flower and the number of flowers per stem was checked first. Lately, it is also essential to pay attention to the health of the plant. As a result of the expensive breeding methods, which also took several years, the Hyacinth was mainly a product for the more elite bulb grower in the early years. That was also when the so-called Bulb villas were built in the Bulb region. These are now a classic feature of the landscape in the area south of Haarlem. Now, Hyacinths are grown by modern companies for whom quality and sustainability are paramount.
From the grower:
The Hyacinth is mostly associated with the bulb fields and the bulb in a pot. However, these days it is also grown as a cut flower. After some trials, it turned out that if you leave the bulb bottom on the stem of the cutting hyacinth (instead of cutting diagonally) it will flower beautifully. It is extremely important that everyone knows this, so there are no disappointments with this exceptionally beautiful, fragrant product. For those who find the scent too penetrating, it is good to know that you can easily put it outside on a garden table to bring colour to your garden. The cutting hyacinth is in fact is well able to endure the Dutch climate.
The collection has been extended with improved versions of the old varieties that were specially selected for breeding good cut flowers. Since the most recent improvement, the Hyacinths are even suitable for growing in water, so it is always possible to deliver fresh flowers. In breeding, the grower talks in terms of lines. The A-line comes from the Hyacinth Anne Marie (pink), which now also has blue (Atlantic), purple (Anna Lisa) and white (Antarctica) varieties, all with the same properties. This line has wonderful, large flowers in bright colours. The same goes for the famous Delft Blue, of which there are now a lilac (Top Hit), a light blue (Caribbean Prince), a pink (China Pink), a white (White King and a purple (Purple Star) variety. This so-called D- line gives more flowers (nails) from a smaller bulb size. This year, Dark Dimension and a double-flowered variety were also introduced.

Hypericum

Hypericum has been known for a long time as a herb that can be used on wounds to nerve-rich tissue such as finger tops and palms. The species, Hypericum perforatum is used for this purpose. For dogs bites for example, using his herb could help prevent Tetanus. The main feature is that it helps to maintain good mental balance. That same mental balance can also be found in enjoying Hypericum which is what the Summerflowers grows us it for, namely cultivating beautiful full branches with berries in all sorts of colours. Since the 1990s, when there was not much colour in the Hypericums, the Hypericum collection was expanded with a true colour palette. Another interesting fact is that the Hypericum actually houses two types of plant in it. Hypericum is a so-called half-shrub. This means that, after winter, the parts above ground can spread out, like a shrub, but it can also make shoots out of the ground, like a perennial. So, it is actually a shrub that you can prune back and that then forms shoots out of the ground like a perennial. Through targeted breeding, there are an increasing number of colours and berries. In short, Hypericum sets the tone in the autumn bouquet.

Ilex

Ilex verticilata is also known as the Winter Berry. In the past, this deciduous, berry-producing Holly from the eastern part of North America, was used by the Native Americans of the region as a medicine. The name was loosely translated as fever berry. For ornamental purposes, this bush is suitable both for planting in the garden and for use as a cut flower. As a cut flower, the bush produces once every two years. In the first year the branches grow and in the second, they blossom and produce berries. An interesting fact is that this crop has male and female plants. Only the female plants give berries, but only if there are males in close by, of course. This is why there are always plants spread over the plot at the nursery that do not give berries; these are the male plants. Also, bee populations are increasingly being used at nurseries where berry products are grown. With these bee populations, it cuts both ways: they can collect enough nectar and at the same time, pollinate the flowers. If this is not good cooperation between growers and nature…? In the autumn the berries are protected with nets against the greediness of birds. Man is not the only lover of these berries.

Leucanthemum

The plant commonly known as Daisy is in fact called Leucanthemum. This botanic name is derived from the ancient Greek words “leukos” (white) and “anthemon” meaning flower. The crop belongs to the composite family (Asteraceae). The Daisy is extremely widespread and grows wild all over Europe, North Africa and the temperate zones of Asia. These temperate flowers are indigenous even in Australia and New Zealand. The genus, Daisy, consists of a large number of varieties of both perennial and annual plants. There are more than 50 sub-species of the Leucanthemum. The plants grown as cut flowers, come from both seed and perennial plants. Only the selected parties of the seed variants are used. With perennial plants it is possible to make a party from a selected plant. Through this breeding, there are even various forms with double flowers on the market.
Through years of selection, the flowers of this seemingly ordinary Daisy are on sale in florists from early April. The peak harvest time is still from mid-May to mid-June, but now because of cultivation techniques Daisies are on sale right through to late Autumn. The grower, who breeds early Daisies, has selected for 30 years to breed a good early variety. Not only does this early Daisy bloom early, it also has sturdy stems and has a good vase-life. The Daisy is a real sign of spring that never bores. The Daisy holds its own both in the longing for nostalgia and the return to nature. The grower must consistently work on selecting on improvements, where now a decisive selection criterion is sustainable flower breeding.

Limonium

Limonium is commonly known as Statice. Yet this is only one of the many forms in which the product is bred. In the past, the Limonium played an important role in the production of dried flower bouquets. Both the annual Statice sinuatum and the perennial tataricum went into these bouquets. The perennial and the annual sinuatum are very popular at the moment. With the sinuatum it is the colours in particular that are so remarkable. With the perennials Limonium latifolia, perezii and sinensis, which includes the Diamond series, the shape is just as important. All Limoniums are known for their durability and excellent qualities in a mixed bouquet.

Lysimachia

Lysimachia belongs to the primrose family (Primulaceae). So it is part of the primula family. In the Netherlands there are also water and riverbank plants that belong to the Lysimachia genus. These mostly yellow-flowering plants can be found in the wild. In the nursery, most Lysimachias are white. The first Lysimachia bred in the Netherlands was the clethroides. This flower is also commonly known as Elephant’s Trunk, because of its special flower shape. Although this clethroides is still being bred, more different forms have come onto the market; these often stand more upright and have that characteristic elephant’s trunk feature to a lesser extent. As of next week, the first Lysimachias will come onto the market. This special form has a slightly more upright spike. This will then be followed by the Lysimachia Jumbo. This Lysimachia is extremely white in colour. Because this product is very difficult to cultivate, it will always remain a specialty. At the moment, the largest Lysimachia is the Elisabeth. This late blooming Lysimachia is strong in leaf and flower and like all Lysimachias, this form has an extremely good shelf-life. The advantage of the Elisabeth is that it is supplied in large numbers throughout the whole summer.

Matthiola

The Violier is known to be a strong-smelling, colourful cut-flower. If you look closely at this flower, you can see that this plant belongs to the same family as the cabbage, namely the Brassicaceae. This can be seen very well during cultivation. First the plantlet grows into a type of rosette for many weeks, the flower only appears during the last two weeks. The name Violier is an adulteration of the Chinese name meaning “Eternal beauty and love, I love you”. Maybe that is why a man, who bought a bunch of violiers from a violer grower every year for 35 years, always added an extra branch for every year of his marriage. In the Netherlands, this flower is also known as Mother’s Day flower. This is mainly because the time the Violier naturally comes into flower in the first cold greenhouses, is always around the Dutch Mother’s Day. Given the extensive colour palette, often pastel shades, this flower is perfectly suited to a celebration like Mother’s Day. The Violier is not the easiest of plants. If it gets hot, the will have difficulty blooming. This is why it is a true spring product. The breeders are working hard at being able to produce beautiful Violiers in late summer. Nice to know that the fact that when the Violier is sown it doesn’t always have double flowers. Before flowering, the difference can only be seen if the young plantlets are put in the cold for a couple of days. At that moment, the colour of the single-flower variety is dark and can be removed. In the past about 50% had to be removed, which was a lot of work. Through cultivation, this too has been reduced. If you take into account that the double violier is infertile, it is obvious that this is quite difficult. The origin of the Matthiola or Violier is the eastern Mediterranean area. Here too it is a real spring bloomer. The Violier can be identified from a distance by its fragrance. A single Violier adds fragrance to a whole bouquet.

Monarda

Monarda didyma, or the Bergamot, is a plant with many applications. In addition to the fact that despite its deceptively fragile appearance, it is an extremely sturdy flower is in a bouquet, its potential goes much further. During its entire growth, the plant gives off a pleasant aromatic fragrance. Even the underground parts have that special fragrance. For tea lovers it might be nice to know that the Monarda is one of the basic ingredients for the production of Earl-Grey tea. In the garden, this plant is one of the most decorative flowers that keeps its colour even in extreme rainfall. Besides its decorative value, the plant is used in the production of natural medicines and cosmetics. The fragrant leaf is used in the kitchen to add flavour to dishes.

Muscari

Muscari, popularly known as “Blue Grape” or “Grape Hyacinth” is a bulb-flower crop that, like the Hosta, by origin belongs to the Asparagus family (Aspergaceae). According to a new system, it can in fact also be classified in the Hyacinth family (Hyacinthaceae). The most well-known variety is the Muscari armeniacum. This is the largest bred variety and is generally used for garden planting. The Muscari armeniacum is also used as a pot plant and in cut flower production. In recent years, Muscari breeding has made significant leaps, adding many new sorts to the collection. Breeding is aimed at improving the properties of the pot and cut varieties. The properties for bouquets simply need to be different from those of a bulb in a pot. Muscari breeding gave us multiple colours and colour varieties of Blue Grape. Although a white variety has been around for a very long time, now white varieties that are suitable for potting and cutting are also grown. Next to the Snowdrop and the Crocus, the Grape Hyacinth is the ultimate sign of spring.

From the grower:

The Grape Hyacinth is the most well-known of the beautiful blue grapes in the spring garden. Most people also know the Grape Hyacinth as a pot bulb rather than a cut flower. Due to breeding, but also temperature treatment of the bulbs, it is possible to encourage most varieties to bloom between January and late April and use as cut flowers. To a lesser degree, the “Blue Grape” is even for sale all year round. What not many people know is that the Grape Hyacinth, contrary to its name, is available from January to late April in other colours. Besides the standard blue colour, this flower is also available in an extremely light blue, a blue so dark it is almost purple, and in white. There are even flowers that have an extra crest on top of the flower. In short, a flower to keep an eye on. It is nice to know that the Grape Hyacinth automatically returns to the garden every year. In spring, they are also an important source of food for many insects like bumble bees and bees who love the honey produced by the flower.

Narcissus

The Narcissus, just like the Amaryllis, the Nerine and the Snowdrop, belongs to the Amaryllidaceous family, or the Narcissus family, also known as the Amaryllis family. The Narcissus is probably one of the most underappreciated flowers in our country. When it comes to the Narcissus, many people think of daffodils, however, there are a multitude of available colours and forms. So it is high time we highlighted them. The Narcissus is so beautiful that anyone who compares himself to one is called Narcissistic. This means that he thinks he is more beautiful and important than anyone else. A flower that earns this, must come from very good stock. The Narcissus is anything but ordinary; not only does the Narcissus come in many colours, it is also available in a multiple forms. These forms include for example: Trumpet, Large Crown, Double, Split Crown and spray Daffodil. This is just a small example of the available Narcissus forms, there are after all approximately 8000 species in about 12 main groups. Besdes its great beauty, the Narcissus is also bred for its medicinal properties. Galanthamine, the substance found in the Narcissus (derived from Galanthus, the official name of the Snowdrop) is used as the basis for a drug that is effective against memory loss in Alzheimer patients.

From the grower:
In the Netherlands, the Narcissus is grown to be traded worldwide as a bulb. It is often the eye-catcher of the early spring garden. Traditionally, the Narcissus is also, ‘bred off’, as it is known in technical jargon. The grower prepares the bulbs, so that they can come into flower in the greenhouse at the time he wishes and sold as cut flowers. It is surprising that the general public is unaware of just how extensive the collection is. The Narcissus growers are also delighted to present their beautiful product on TV. They want nothing more than for everyone to enjoy the passion they feel for these extraordinary flowers.
Besides the ‘normal’ collection, such as the Trumpet Daffodil, Dutch Master narcissus, the Large Crown ‘Carlton’ narcissus and the two-tone ‘Ice Follies’, and the double ‘Dick Wilde’, there are also the spray daffodils. What we have here are the single flowered ‘Grand Soleil d’Or ’, ‘Avalanche’ and ‘Paper White’, and the bubble flowered spray daffodil ‘Sir Winston Churchill’. Most spray daffodils also give off a perfumed scent, bringing spring right into your home. In short, a beautiful sight you can never get enough of.

Nerine

The Nerine is an indigenous, South African crop with about 30 species. Although they were first described as Lilies, they are not actually related. The Nerine belongs to the Amaryllidaceous family. The Amaryllis, Narcissus and Snowdrop also belong to the same family. The common feature is that the ovary is not found in the flower, but under it in a so-called inferior ovary. This can also be clearly seen in the Nerine. The first official name that was given to this plant in 1755 was Imhofia. In 1820 the name was changed to Nerine. This name comes from the story of a ship with a cargo of bulbs destined for the Netherlands that was shipwrecked in the channel and the boxes of bulbs washed up on the Guernsey coast. The bulbs were propagated under the favourable channel island climatic conditions. The name Nerine was given because of this incident. It derives from the name Nereids: the name for sea nymphs in Greek mythology. So the Nerine got its name from the 50 beautiful daughters of the sea god Nerius. The name was probably also prompted by the fact that the Nerine somehow always reminds us of pure, feminine beauty: the finely formed flowers that glisten with silver and gold sprinkled petals, are worthy of a mermaid.
From the grower: The Nerine currently most used for flowers are the cultivars from the bowdenii species. Traditionally the colour of the Nerine is old pink. This colour is seen in the cultivar varieties Roon from Kennemerland and Favourite from the Westland. Through intensive breeding, not only have more colours been introduced to the market, but the quality of the Nerine as cut flower has also improved. The colours in which Nerine is now sold are white, light pink, salmon and deep pink. There is even a two-tone type on the market (bicolour). A completely new development is the colour red. It won’t be long before this colour is also on sale in the flower shop.

Peony

Although the Peony is currently the only plant that officially belongs to the Peony family (Paeoniaceae), given the many common properties, the old classification of the Ranunculus family (Ranunculaceae) suits this plant much better. The Ranunculus, Delphinium, Aconitum and Helleborus also belong to this family. The botanical name, Paeonia, is derived from the word Paieon. Paieon was the god of healing. This is fits well with the fact that in early history, the Peony was grown for medical purposes. These days, the Peony is used as an ornamental garden plant and as a cut flower. There are over 3000 different Peony roses. These are divided into groups, with the lactiflora being the most important. In addition, many early species are descendants of the Peony officinalis, or Farmer’s Peony. There are also very many successful cross-breeds from other main groups that make the Peony collection quite surprising.

From the grower: Breeding Peony roses is a long-standing activity. It is only possible to cut good flowers from the plant, three years after planting out. The choice of species must therefore be done over a very long period. Because of the numerous species, the supply period for Peony is quite long, from late April from the southern European countries, up to late June from the Netherlands. The most important issue with the Peony is its maturity. A Peony that is too raw, will not blossom well. If you buy Peony in the shop, the slightly more mature Peony that is almost open or even just open, is the best choice. These Peonies are much prettier and last longer in the vase than flowers put in the vase still fully in bud. For Peony it is extremely important to add cut flower plant food to the vase water. Not only do the flowers bloom better, they look more vibrant and prettier. A little extra attention helps you enjoy your Peony roses more. For that reason, here is a wonderful story about the most bred Peony Rose, the Sarah Bernhardt.

The most famous Peony in the Netherlands is the large pink Sarah Bernhardt. This Peony was introduced to the market in 1906 by Lemoine and called after the then famous actress Sarah Bernhardt. This French actress said goodbye to mainland Europe and headed for the wild west, where starting in 1880, she made 6 trips across Lucky Luke country and visited all the most well-known Western locations by train. For comic-strip lovers, this famous comic hero’s album, Sarah Bernhardt, completely dedicated to this actress. In the Netherlands, Sarah Bernhardt is famous mainly as Peony rose, but now a Peony rose with a great story.

Phlox

The Phlox or flame flower belongs to the Flame Flower family (Polemoniaceae). The plant gets its name from the ancient Greek word, phlox, meaning flame. This name describes the flame-red colours that made the wild North American Phlox so striking. The collection was developed from the plants that were brought to Europe in the 18th century. Phlox is mainly a perennial, which is not only a cut flower, but also has countless species that are a tremendous asset in the garden as a ground cover. In addition to the perennials there is also the annual variety, like the richly flowering Phlox drummondii. Most of the cut flower Cultivars come from the perennial plant type, paniculata, which means fan shaped. The fan shape refers to the structure of the inflorescence. This rests like a fan on the flower stem.

Quinoa

Chenopodium quinoa is now making a breakthrough worldwide as a super food. However, this product was cultivated as an agricultural product 6000 years ago by the South American Incas. What hardly anyone knows is that Summerflowers grower Welgelegen has been growing this plant as a cut flower for 15 years. It started with a request from Wageningen (University) in 1995 to try the plant as a cut flower. Its failure to take off as food crop (the varieties grown then were, according to connoisseurs, too bitter), resulted in the cultivation of Quinoa as cut flower. Cultivation began at the Zeeland company Welgelegen and at Adriaan van Eerdt in the North East polder. The then Wageningen breeder Dick Mastenbroek gave the initial impetus to breed more on colour and longevity. This was the basis for the blend that breeder Jaap van de Berge of Welgelegen nursery developed further. After a number of years of trial and research, cultivation has been serious business at Welgelegen nursery for over 10 years. Now that Quinoa is finally breaking through as a food product, it is also time to pay more attention to Quinoa as cut flower. If this isn’t a good story for the florist, I don’t know what is. Health and beauty have never gone together as well as with this, very decorative and sturdy cut flower. As the old saying goes “Spread the word”.

Ranunculus

The Ranunculus belongs to the Ranunculus family (Ranunculaceae). The flower originally comes from the temperate regions of Europe. The most well-known offspring of the Ranunculus family is the Buttercup or Crowfoot. Other members of the Ranunculus family are the Peony, Delphinium and Aconitum. The Ranunculus plants bred by us are sometimes grown from seed but the really beautiful species come from mini tubers, also known as cloves because of their shape, planted in the greenhouse in the autumn. Given the family relationship it is not strange that there are now many so-called peony-types of Ranunculus on the market. The flowers are becoming larger and fuller through breeding. In addition, to the Elegance and Aarur series, now the Pon Pon series, has recently won the Glass Tulip Award. This will be very familiar to Rob, since he sat on the jury for this prize. The Ranunculus used here are from prize winner Rijk de Jongh Flowers.
The Ranunculus is a symbol of charm. In Victorian times you told the recipient of a bouquet of Ranunculus “I think you are immensely attractive”. The funny thing is that the Latin word Ranunculus (its official name) means little frog. This name was probably chosen because the wild Ranunculus grows best in marshy areas. With a little fantasy, you can easily see the origins of the fairytale of the Princess and the Frog.

From the grower:
For the grower of seasonal flowers, the Ranunculus is actually the beginning of spring. The first flowers come into bloom as early as February, and can be harvested. Even this early in the spring, the Ranunculus has an impeccable track record when it comes to longevity in the vase. Often the Ranunculus will endure the longest in a bouquet of flowers. Because the flowers are so extremely full it seems like the flowers continue to bloom more.

Rosehip

Besides its enormous decorative value, in the first place, the Rosehip is a source of healthy things such as vitamin C. The Rosehip also contains vitamins A, B1 and B2. This is also why Rosehip is processed in jam and the so-called Rosehip syrup. Because of its nice taste, it is a good way to give children some vitamins. The Rosehip is also a veritable medicine cabinet for birds. Many birds that are here in winter, live from these colourful berries. Yet, growers who grow Rosehip for its ornamental value prefer not to take this into account. It is good to know that the attraction for birds is greatest when the hips are overripe. For cutting, mainly the shape, colour and vase-life are important. There are many types of Rosehip. The most well-known are the large hips that can be used as the main flower in a bouquet. Lately, however, there are more species with multiple small hips that are cut as twig and used as handy bouquet fillers, transforming every bouquet into something special. These same Rosehips can in fact be harvested as whole branch. In this way, you have branches that are more than 2 metres tall, which are ideally suited to forming complete flower arrangements. So the Rosehip is far from being at the end of its potential. High time to do even more with it.

Sedum

The Sedum experienced a real spurt this year in terms of expanding the collection. In addition to the standard Herbsfreude, (the one everyone calls Spectabile) and the long-established Matrona, there are a multitude of innovations on the market. Besides the extremely dark-leaved species such as Postman’s Pride, now more brightly coloured Sedum such as Lizzy, Dark Red and Bon Bon are being sold. The so-called Xenox types will also come onto the market soon. These types have almost phosphorescent colours. Due to innovations in the collection, Sedum can be used in many more bouquets. Of course, the Herbsfreude will remain a major player but due to the arrival of new colours, Sedum can take its well-earned place in the collection.

Symphonicarpos

Symphoricarpos is more commonly known as the Snow Berry. This deciduous shrub belongs to the same family as the Honeysuckle, i.e. Caprifoliaceae. The Symphoricarpos is indigenous to North and Central America. The name Symphoricarpos comes from the Greek words, symphorein, meaning “to carry together” and karpos, which means “fruit”. The name refers to the tightly packed fruit (berries) of the plant. The name Snow Berry comes from the originally snow white colour of these berries. Once the berries are broken, the inside resembles flakes of freshly fallen snow.
The plant is regularly used as a hedging plant. The berries are very popular with children who shoot them through a piece of PVC tubing. The branches of this plant are now used as cut flowers (berry) in late summer and autumn bouquets. Actually, the name Snow Berry is no longer accurate since the Symphoricarpos is now available in many colours besides white. Because they are bred specially as cut flowers, the branches have become much sturdier and are easier to handle without the berries falling off. Due to the different shapes of the branches, this product can be used in a wider range of bouquet. In addition to being used in “normal” flower arrangements, the Symphoricarpos is very frequently used in more exclusive flower arrangements. In short, the Symphoricarpos is jack of all trades.

Symphoricarpos

Symphoricarpos is more commonly known as the Snow Berry. This deciduous shrub belongs to the same family as the Honeysuckle, i.e. Caprifoliaceae. The Symphoricarpos is indigenous to North and Central America. The name Symphoricarpos comes from the Greek words, symphorein, meaning “to carry together” and karpos, which means “fruit”. The name refers to the tightly packed fruit (berries) of the plant. The name Snow Berry comes from the originally snow white colour of these berries. Once the berries are broken, the inside resembles flakes of freshly fallen snow.
The plant is regularly used as a hedging plant. The berries are very popular with children who shoot them through a piece of PVC tubing. The branches of this plant are now used as cut flowers (berry) in late summer and autumn bouquets. Actually, the name Snow Berry is no longer accurate since the Symphoricarpos is now available in many colours besides white. Because they are bred specially as cut flowers, the branches have become much sturdier and are easier to handle without the berries falling off. Due to the different shapes of the branches, this product can be used in a wider range of bouquet. In addition to being used in “normal” flower arrangements, the Symphoricarpos is very frequently used in more exclusive flower arrangements. In short, the Symphoricarpos is jack of all trades.

Trachelium

Trachelium caeruleum is a beautiful, often purple flower, which is cultivated in the greenhouse in the Netherlands. Commonly known as blue throatwort; a name it was given because not it looks like a neck, but because the roots of the plant were once used to make medicine for sore throats. The name Trachelium was probably also given to the plant because it works well against inflammation of the trachea. Although that is not immediately apparent, the Trachelium belongs to the family of bell flower (Campanula). Trachelium is not one of the easiest crops to cultivate. Because the cut flower’s reaction to cultivation techniques differs per soil type and moisture retention, it takes a lot of in-house experience to breed a beautiful flower. This ensures that the production of Trachelium has been very stable for years. The three main colours of Trachelium are purple, blue and white. The beautiful, flat shield with multiple delicate flowers, ensures that the presence of the flower in a bouquet is both refined and clearly visible.

Veronica

The Veronica we cultivate is a perennial. The name Speedwell is mainly used for the woody species of this genus and it is supposed to ward off witches and lightning. The Veronica was also used as a medicine for lung ailments. The perennial that we use in floriculture has Saint Veronica to thank for its name; she eased Christ’s suffering and wiped Jesus’ face, leaving an impression on a cloth, and gave him a ‘vere unica’, worthy end. In short, plenty to tell at the counter. In the Netherlands, a wide range of Veronica is grown. In this way the Dutch grower tries to add an extra dimension to Veronica as a seasonal product. Dutch growers also believe it is important that Veronicas remain available to people who prefer to buy local European products. In this way, the Dutch Veronica continues to be a valuable addition to the Veronica imported from other countries. For the fans, Veronica is also the title of a song from the prematurely deceased, Dutch singer, Cornelis Vreeswijk. Just in case the customer takes longer to make his decision to buy Veronicas.

On this website we use first or third-party tools that store small files (cookie) on your device. Cookies are normally used to allow the site to run properly (technical cookies), to generate navigation usage reports (statistics cookies) and to suitable advertise our services/products (profiling cookies). We can directly use technical cookies, but you have the right to choose whether or not to enable statistical and profiling cookies. Enabling these cookies, you help us to offer you a better experience. Privacy policy